Most unusual mathematics coursework topics

Math is everywhere in our day to day life, through taxes, bills, simple shopping excursions, and much more, you realize that math is everywhere. Every teacher has their own unique way of teaching things, however, what happens when the math itself is unique? Many people are not d of math. They don't see it as something fun or quirky, or something to enjoy or find humor in. Here's some unusual math that may interest you.

Use Common Math Quesion

There's a mind boggling equation that confuses a lot of people, and has been referenced many times in culture through jokes or comics. The simple equation of "9 x 1/9 = 1." is quite simple. Nine times one ninth still equals one, however, one ninth equals .1111111. . ., which means it's a repetition to infinity. This means that 9 x (.1111111. . . )=1. If we calculate that out, it equals .999999. . ., but it never actually hits being able to be 1, yet the equation still equals one. It's mind boggling and confusing, but still extremely interesting, unusual and in a sense fun.

A similar problem from the one above is the fact that you can go from zero to one by moving by one half the distance. You' will approach one asymptotically, but you'll never actually reach one. This is another type of thing that will have people trying to figure out

Use Patterns

Did you know that there are exactly 17 geometric pattern groups in the entire universe? It's strange to think that repetitive two dimensional arrangements of shapes can intertwine with each other and relate to one or another "wallpaper groups" by just a simple study of it.

Use Math Laws

Finally, there's the idea of prime spirals, or more formally known as the Ulam spiral. It visualizes prime numbers to essentially spiral out when written down. Since all prime numbers are odd, minus the lone number of 2, they'll be placed on diagonals that switch from odd and even numbers. These prime numbers alternate diagonals in the Ulam spiral, and it's even more interesting that the prime numbers tend to lay on some diagonals more than others. There are also diagonal lines when enough numbers are plotted, and this pattern also continues even if its center point is not one. It's something unique that you wouldn't expect from Math.

Of course, not everyone will find this remotely interesting, but you have to admit, it's extremely unusual and at least proves that at times numbers and math can be their own forms of entertaining puzzles when need be.